212 Sampson's Mill Rd.
Mashpee, MA 02649
508-477-5800 X 12

 

Nelson Andrews Jr – Emergency Preparedness Department Director

Email: Nelson.Andrews@mwtribe-nsn.gov

Phone: 508-477-5800 ext. 15

Cell: 774 327-8367

 

Allyssa Hathaway – Emergency Preparedness Specialist

Email: Allyssa.Hathaway@mwtribe-nsn.gov

Phone: 508-477-5800 Ext. 13

Cell: 508-648-3522

 

 


Social Media                                     
Facebook: www.facebook.com/mwteprep
Twitter: @MWTEmergPrep

 

 

Click here to view entire Home Heating saftey guide and Car Preparedness Tips

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                                Governor Baker Proclaims “Hurricane Preparedness Week”

Residents Encouraged to Prepare Now

FRAMINGHAM, MA – Governor Charlie Baker has proclaimed July 16-22, 2017 to be Hurricane Preparedness Week to underscore the Commonwealth’s vulnerability to tropical storms and hurricanes and the importance of preparing for the impacts that hurricanes and tropical storms can have on the state’s residents, homes, businesses and infrastructure. 

“It is never too early to start preparing yourself, family, home and business for a tropical storm or hurricane,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “As we enter into hurricane season, major storms can occur at any time, and making emergency and evacuation plans now can minimize damage and the impact on public safety.”

“MEMA actively works with our communities in Massachusetts and partners across all levels of government to enhance our readiness for the next hurricane or major storm,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “We encourage residents take the actions necessary to improve preparedness in the event of a major storm or other type of disaster.”

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 2017 seasonal outlook predicts an above-normal number of Atlantic Ocean hurricanes this season. “It is important to remember that regardless of the number of storms this season, it only takes one storm to cause devastating impacts in the state,” said Public Safety and Security Secretary Dan Bennett, “especially if you are not prepared when it hits.”

“All residents of the Commonwealth should prepare for the impacts of a tropical storm or hurricane,” said MEMA Director Kurt Schwartz. “Hurricanes and tropical storms can affect the entire state, and history has shown that these powerful storms can produce devastating impacts, including deadly storm surge, heavy inland rainfall and flooding, and destructive winds, even if they do not make direct landfall in Massachusetts.”

Know Your Evacuation Zone
Massachusetts has established hurricane evacuation zones in each of the state’s coastal communities.  These zones, designated as Zone A, Zone B and Zone C, identify the areas of coastal communities that are at risk for storm surge flooding from tropical storms or hurricanes. If evacuations are necessary because of an approaching tropical storm or hurricane, local or state officials will use the hurricane evacuation zones to call for people living, working or vacationing in these areas to evacuate. It is important to note that even areas not directly along a coastline may be at risk for storm surge flooding during a tropical storm or hurricane. Find out if you live, work or vacation in a hurricane evacuation zone by visiting the ‘Know Your Zone’ interactive map located on MEMA’s website at www.mass.gov/knowyourzone.

New Storm Surge Forecast Products
New for 2017, the National Weather Service will issue storm surge watches and warnings to alert residents of areas that have a significant risk of life-threatening inundation from an approaching tropical storm or hurricane.

Storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a tropical cyclone, and it can occur at different times and at different locations from a storm’s hazardous winds. While most coastal residents can remain in their homes and be safe from a tropical cyclone’s winds, evacuations are often needed to keep people safe from storm surge. These watches and warnings will help local and state officials make better informed evacuation decisions, and will help people who are in harm’s way because they live or work along, or near the coast, better understand their need to evacuate in order to avoid the deadly risks associated with storm surge flooding.

Make an Emergency Plan
It’s important to have plans in case your family needs to take action before or during a storm:
• Communications Plan — Create a family communications plan so you can stay in touch and find each other in an emergency.

• Evacuation Plan — Create a family evacuation plan that details where you will go, how you will get there, what you will bring, and what you will do with your pets.

• Shelter-in-Place Plan — Make sure your family has a plan to shelter in place, which includes stockpiling items you will need to stay comfortable while you are at home. Be prepared to shelter in place for at least 72 hours. 

Make sure your emergency plans address the needs of all of your family members, including seniors, children, individuals with medical needs, and people with disabilities.

Have an Emergency Kit
Hurricanes can cause extended power outages, flooding, and blocked roads. You should have an emergency kit to sustain yourself and your family for at least 72 hours in case you lose power, are stranded in your home, or nearby stores are closed or damaged. While it is important to customize your kit to meet your family’s unique needs, every emergency kit should include bottled water, food, a flashlight, a radio and extra batteries, a first aid kit, sanitation items, clothing, cash and a charged cell phone. Depending on your family’s needs, emergency kits should also include medications, extra eyeglasses, medical equipment and supplies, children’s items such as diapers and formula, food and supplies for pets and service animals, and other items you or your family members might need during a disaster.

Stay Informed
As a storm approaches, monitor media reports and follow instructions from public safety officials with these tools:
• Massachusetts Alerts App — Download the free Massachusetts Alerts app for your iOS or Android device. The app provides tropical storm and hurricane warnings, as well as important public safety alerts and information from MEMA.
• Social Media — Follow MEMA on Twitter (@MassEMA) and Facebook for emergency updates during hurricanes.
• Mass 2-1-1 — Mass 2-1-1 is the state non-emergency call center for disasters. Call 2-1-1 to find out about shelter locations, travel restrictions, disaster assistance programs, and more. Mass 2-1-1 is free and available 24/7.
• Local Emergency Notification Systems — Check with your local emergency management director to see if your community uses an emergency notification system and how to sign up.

For more information, visit the Hurricane Safety Tips section of MEMA’s website at http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/emergencies/hurricanes/.

About MEMA
MEMA is the state agency charged with ensuring the state is prepared to withstand, respond to, and recover from all types of emergencies and disasters, including natural hazards, accidents, deliberate attacks, and technological and infrastructure failures. MEMA's staff of professional planners, communications specialists and operations and support personnel is committed to an all hazards approach to emergency management. By building and sustaining effective partnerships with federal, state and local government agencies, and with the private sector - individuals, families, non-profits and businesses - MEMA ensures the Commonwealth's ability to rapidly recover from large and small disasters by assessing and mitigating threats and hazards, enhancing preparedness, ensuring effective response, and strengthening our capacity to rebuild and recover. For additional information about MEMA and Emergency Preparedness, go to www.mass.gov/mema.

Continue to follow MEMA updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MassEMA; Facebook at www.facebook.com/MassachusettsEMA; YouTube at www.youtube.com/MassachusettsEMA.

Massachusetts Alerts: to receive emergency information on your smartphone, including severe weather alerts from the National Weather Service and emergency information from MEMA, download the free Massachusetts Alerts app. To learn more about Massachusetts Alerts, and for information on how to download the free app onto your smartphone, visit: www.mass.gov/mema/mobileapp. 
 

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PREPARING TO EVACUATE COASTAL AREAS IN ADVANCE OF A HURRICANE
MWT EPREP Offers Hurricane Preparedness Tips


MASHPEE, MA – As part of continued hurricane preparedness planning, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Emergency Preparedness Department (MWTEPREP) is urging tribal community residents  who may live or work within our vast coastal community or near a river or other waterway that is connected to the ocean, to develop home and business evacuation plans and be prepared to evacuate areas that may be inundated with flood waters as a result of an approaching hurricane or tropical storm. 

Storm surge and large battering waves generated by tropical storms and hurricanes often pose a greater threat than wind to life and property during tropical storms and hurricanes.  In areas at risk of storm surge flooding, evacuation to high ground in advance of a powerful storm making landfall may be the only way to avoid injury or death from storm surge.

“Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Emergency Preparedness working close with local, county, state and Federal public safety officials will constantly track these storms as they move towards the Northeast. Impending storms will be tracked with the latest hurricane decision making evacuation software and informing the Tribal Community will be conducted with enough time before a hurricane makes landfall so that people are able to move to safety with the appropriate amount of time”. Stated by MWT EPREP Director Nelson Andrews Jr.   

Keys to successful evacuations include ensuring that residents of, and workers in coastal communities monitor approaching storms, receive evacuation orders in a timely manner, have home and business evacuation plans, and follow those plans when evacuation orders are issued. 

Plan Ahead for an Evacuation
• To learn whether you live, work or will be vacationing in a designated hurricane evacuation zone, use the ‘Know Your Evacuation Zone’ interactive map which is located on MEMA’s website at http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/emergencies/hurricanes/hurricane-evacuation-zones.html.
• If you are located in a designated evacuation zone, you should be prepared to evacuate well before a hurricane or tropical storm makes landfall.
• Know how to receive emergency information, including recommendations or orders to evacuate. 


o Sign up for the MWTEPREP Health and Homeland Alert (HHAN) notification system.

 
o Monitor news broadcasts


o Download Massachusetts Alerts to your smartphone. This is a free app from the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency.


o Follow MWTEPREP on Twitter or Facebook.


o Follow MEMA on Twitter or Facebook.


o Follow MWTEPREP and other local public safety agencies on social media.


• Make a Family Emergency Plan.  If you must evacuate, know where you will go, how you will get there, what you will bring.  Make sure that your plan includes provisions for children, seniors, and family members with disabilities or medical issues.  Include your pets in your Family Emergency Plan. While service animals will be allowed inside shelters, household pets are not allowed in all shelters. Go to MEMA’s Pets and Animals in Emergencies webpage at http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/be-prepared/pets for additional tips. Remember: “If you go, they go!


• Assemble an emergency kit. Keep your supplies in an easy-to-carry kit that you can take with you in case you must evacuate.


• If you or a family member may require special assistance to evacuate, ask MWTEPREP about special assistance programs or registries.


• If you undergo routine medical treatments or receive home health services, work with your service providers in advance to understand their emergency plans and to find backup providers that you might use in an emergency.


• Keep your car fueled if an evacuation seems likely. Gas stations may be closed during an emergency, or unable to pump gas during power outages.


• If you do not have personal transportation or a way to evacuate (such as public transportation), make transportation arrangements with family, friends or your contact MWTEPREP for guidance. 

If Asked to Evacuate
• Listen carefully to instructions and information from public safety officials and evacuate immediately.


• Gather only essential items and remember to take your emergency kit.  Remember you may be away from home for up to a few days.


• Tell your family emergency contact where you are going.


• Advise family members who are outside the area not to return home.


• Wear appropriate clothing and sturdy shoes.


• If you go to a shelter, notify staff of any special needs you or your family may have.


• If designated evacuation routes are established, follow the routes; other routes might be blocked.  Expect heavy traffic.  If on Cape Cod utilize the Cape Cod Emergency traffic plan.


• Do not return to the evacuation area until the evacuation order is lifted.


• Do not call 9-1-1 unless you have an emergency. Call your local non-emergency number, or 2-1-1 for non-emergency information or questions.

If you have enough time before you leave
• Elevate valuable items to higher points within your home in case of flooding.


• Secure outdoor items (lawn furniture, grills, hanging plants, trashcans, awnings, toys, etc.) or move them indoors.


• Close and lock windows and doors.


• Turn off lights and appliances.


• Turn off water, electricity, and gas (if instructed to do so).


• Check with neighbors, members of our tribal community and our tribal elders to see if they need assistance.

Visit www.mass.gov/ready for comprehensive preparedness tips and information.

MWTEPREP is the tribal department responsible for ensuring the tribe is prepared to withstand, respond to, and recover from all types of emergencies and disasters, including natural hazards, accidents, deliberate attacks, and technological and infrastructure failures.  MWTEPREP utilizes skills, knowledge, and experience in planning, operations, and logistics in coordination with communications specialists, tribal emergency response team and tribal volunteer community emergency response team and are committed to an all hazards approach to emergency management.  By building and sustaining effective partnerships with federal, tribal, state and local government agencies, and with individuals, families, non-profits and businesses.  MWTEPREP ensures the tribes ability to quickly recover from large and small disasters by assessing and mitigating threats, vulnerabilities, hazards, enhancing preparedness, ensuring effective response, and working toward strengthening our capacity to rebuild and recover on our own whenever possible.

Continue to follow MWT EPREP updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MWTEmergPrep; Facebook at www.facebook.com/mwteprep;

For additional information about MEMA and Hurricane Preparedness, go to www.mass.gov/mema. Continue to follow MEMA updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MassEMA; Facebook at www.facebook.com/MassachusettsEMA; and YouTube at www.youtube.com/MassachusettsEMA.

Massachusetts Alerts: To receive emergency information on your smartphone, including severe weather alerts from the National Weather Service and emergency information from MEMA, download the Massachusetts Alerts free app. To learn more about Massachusetts Alerts, and for information on how to download the free app onto your smartphone, visit: www.mass.gov/mema/mobileapp.

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MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBAL NATION PREPARES TO ENTER THE 2016 HURRICANE SEASON

MASHPEE, MA – The start of the Atlantic Hurricane Season begins today.  The Atlantic Hurricane Season is from June 1st through November 30th.  In the past most tropical storms and hurricanes that have impacted  our area have normally occurred around the months of August and September, it is very important to begin preparing yourself, your family, your home and assets, and your business now.  Over the next few months the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Emergency Preparedness Department (MWTEPREP) along with the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) will be sharing important preparedness information to increase awareness of the possible impacts of a hurricane or tropical storm and ensure the continued safety of our tribal citizens visitors and property.

Although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) seasonal outlook predicts a normal number of hurricanes this season, it is important to remember that it only takes one storm to severely impact an area. Additionally, it is important to understand that hurricanes and tropical storms can impact the entire Commonwealth not just coastal regions. For example, Tropical Storm Irene produced devastating flooding in Central and Western Massachusetts.  Therefore, all Massachusetts residents need to prepare for the possibility of a hurricane impacting Massachusetts and the surrounding areas this season. To learn more about the hazards associated with hurricanes and tropical storms, visit the MEMA’s hurricane webpage: www.mass.gov/mema/hurricanes.

“The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Emergency Preparedness Department along with the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency are ensuring to offer vital hurricane preparedness tips, recommendations, briefings and presentations” stated MWTEPREP Director Nelson Andrews Jr.  “Preparation for hurricanes and other disasters rely on three key principles, build an emergency kit, create a plan and stay informed.”

 


Build an Emergency Kit


Building an emergency kit is an important component of personal preparedness.  It is particularly important during hurricane season, as there is the threat of extended power outages, flooding, and impassable debris-covered roads. Emergency kits should include items that will sustain you and your family in the event you are isolated for three to five days without power or unable to go to a store. While some items, such as bottled water, food, flashlight, radio and extra batteries, first aid kit, sanitation items and clothing should be in everyone’s kit, it is important to customize the kit to meet your needs and the needs of your family. Consider adding medications, extra eyeglasses, contact lenses, dentures, extra batteries for hearing aids or wheelchairs, and other medical information and supplies such as an oxygen tank, lists of allergies, medications and dosages, medical insurance information, and medical records.  Additionally, your emergency kit should include supplies for your pet, such as food, pet carriers and other supplies, medications, and vaccination and medical records. For a complete emergency kit checklist, visit: http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/be-prepared/kit/.

You should also consider making a mobile “go-bag” version of your emergency kit in case you need to evacuate to a shelter or other location. At least annually, check your kit for any food, water, batteries, or other items that may need to be replaced or have expired.

Create a Family Emergency Communications Plan


Families should develop a Family Emergency Communications Plan in case family members are separated from one another during a hurricane or other emergencies. The plan should address how you will communicate with one another and how your family plans to reunite after the immediate crisis passes. A Family Communications Plan helps ensure everyone’s safety and minimize the stress associated with emergencies: http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/be-prepared/plan/.

Plans should include the name of a relative or friend who has agreed to serve as the Family Emergency Communications Plan contact person.  Ideally, this person should reside out-of-state to increase the likelihood that they are not impacted by the same event. As part of a Communication Plan, you should create a personal support network and a list of contacts that include caregivers, friends, neighbors, service/care providers, and others who might be able to assist during an emergency.  Keep the list of contacts in a safe, accessible place (particularly if your cell phone is lost or dead) and make sure everyone within your family knows the name, address and telephone number of the Family Communications Plan contact person.  It is important to remember that text messages are often a viable means of communication when telephone service is disrupted during and after a disaster.

To ensure you will be able to reunite after a disaster, it can be helpful to designate two meeting areas for family members – one within your community (your primary location), and one outside of your community (your alternate location). An emergency may impact your neighborhood or small section of your community, so a second location outside of your community may be more accessible to all family members.

Stay Informed

It is important to identify ways to obtain information before, during and after a hurricane.  MEMA encourages people who live or work in a coastal community to “Know Your Zone”. Go to www.mass.gov/knowyourzone to use the interactive map on MEMA’s website to find out if your home or place of work is in a hurricane evacuation zone. Prior to a tropical storm or hurricane making landfall, local or state officials may call for people who live or work in designated evacuation zones, which are areas at risk of storm surge flooding, to evacuate.

It is also important to closely monitor media reports and promptly follow instructions from public safety officials as a storm approaches.  Information on severe weather watches and warnings will be available from media sources, the National Weather Service, a NOAA all-hazards radio, and on your cell phone.  These warnings can provide valuable and timely information. It is important to learn whether local authorities will use other communication and alerting tools to warn you of a pending or current disaster situation and how they will provide information to you before, during and after a disaster.  Some communities have local tools to alert residents.

MWTEPREP utilizes an alert notification known as the Health and Homeland Alert Network (HHAN).  If you would like your phone number and email address (Up to 3) added to the HHAN please email contact information to nelson.andrews@mwtribe.com

Additionally, MEMA utilizes Massachusetts Alerts to disseminate critical information to smartphones. Massachusetts Alerts is powered by a free downloadable application that is available for Android and iPhone devices.  Learn more about Massachusetts Alerts at www.mass.gov/mema/mobileapp. 

Before and during a major storm, call Mass 2-1-1 if you have questions or need information on emergency resources.  Mass 2-1-1 is the Commonwealth’s primary non-emergency telephone call center during times of disasters and emergencies. 2-1-1 is free to the public, available 24 hours a day/7 days a week, confidential, multilingual, and TTY compatible.

There are multiple ways to obtain information before, during and after a hurricane.  You should consider all the ways you might get information during an incident (radio, TV, social media, Internet, cell phone, landline, etc.) in case one or more of those systems stops working.

MWTEPREP is the tribal department charged with ensuring the tribe is prepared to withstand, respond to, and recover from all types of emergencies and disasters on our own whenever possible, including natural hazards, accidents, deliberate attacks, and technological and infrastructure failures. MWTEPREP professional staff of planners, emergency managers and outreach coordinators is committed to an all hazards approach to emergency management. By building and sustaining effective partnerships with federal, state, county and local government agencies, and with the private sector - individuals, families, non-profits and businesses - MWTEPREP ensures the tribes ability to rapidly recover from large and small disasters by assessing and mitigating threats and hazards, enhancing preparedness, ensuring effective response, and strengthening our capacity to rebuild and recover.

For additional information about MEMA and Emergency Preparedness, go to www.mass.gov/mema.

 

Massachusetts Alerts: to receive emergency information on your smartphone, including severe weather alerts from the National Weather Service and emergency information from MEMA, download the Massachusetts Alerts free app. To learn more about Massachusetts Alerts, and for information on how to download the free app onto your smartphone, visit: www.mass.gov/mema/mobileapp.
 

 

Continue to follow MWT E-Prep updates on

Twitter at  http://www.twitter.com/MWTEmergPrep

Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/mwteprepep

Continue to follow MEMA updates on

Twitter at www.twitter.com/MassEMA;

Facebook at www.facebook.com/MassachusettsEMA;

YouTube at www.youtube.com/MassachusettsEMA.

Massachusetts Alerts: to receive emergency information on your smartphone, including severe weather alerts from the National Weather Service and emergency information from MEMA, download the Massachusetts Alerts free app. To learn more about MassAlerts, and for information on how to download the free app onto your smartphone, visit: www.mass.gov/mema/mobileapp

 

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Quick reference to local Emergency Shelter guide offered by the Barnstable County Regional Emergecy Prepardeness Committee:

Please click  ~  http://www.bcrepc.org/sheltering/

 

Mission Statement


MWT E-Prep’s mission is to support our Tribal citizens to ensure that as a Sovereign Nation we work together to make all reasonable efforts to prevent and mitigate against all hazards, prepare for and respond to emergencies, and initiate recovery activities on our own, whenever possible.